performance - java - radix sort - Why is processing a sorted array faster than processing an unsorted array?

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Here is a piece of C++ code that shows some very peculiar behavior. For some strange reason, sorting the data miraculously makes the code almost six times faster:

#include <algorithm>
#include <ctime>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    // Generate data
    const unsigned arraySize = 32768;
    int data[arraySize];

    for (unsigned c = 0; c < arraySize; ++c)
        data[c] = std::rand() % 256;

    // !!! With this, the next loop runs faster.
    std::sort(data, data + arraySize);

    // Test
    clock_t start = clock();
    long long sum = 0;

    for (unsigned i = 0; i < 100000; ++i)
    {
        // Primary loop
        for (unsigned c = 0; c < arraySize; ++c)
        {
            if (data[c] >= 128)
                sum += data[c];
        }
    }

    double elapsedTime = static_cast<double>(clock() - start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;

    std::cout << elapsedTime << std::endl;
    std::cout << "sum = " << sum << std::endl;
}

Initially, I thought this might be just a language or compiler anomaly, so I tried Java:

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Random;

public class Main
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        // Generate data
        int arraySize = 32768;
        int data[] = new int[arraySize];

        Random rnd = new Random(0);
        for (int c = 0; c < arraySize; ++c)
        data[c] = rnd.nextInt() % 256;

        // !!! With this, the next loop runs faster
        Arrays.sort(data);

        // Test
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        long sum = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i)
        {
            // Primary loop
            for (int c = 0; c < arraySize; ++c)
            {
                if (data[c] >= 128)
                    sum += data[c];
            }
        }

        System.out.println((System.nanoTime() - start) / 1000000000.0);
        System.out.println("sum = " + sum);
    }
}

Aplet123



Answer #1

By using the 0/1 value of the decision bit as an index into an array, we can make code that will be equally fast whether the data is sorted or not sorted. Our code will always add a value, but when the decision bit is 0, we will add the value somewhere we don't care about. Here's the code:

// Test
clock_t start = clock();
long long a[] = {0, 0};
long long sum;

for (unsigned i = 0; i < 100000; ++i)
{
    // Primary loop
    for (unsigned c = 0; c < arraySize; ++c)
    {
        int j = (data[c] >> 7);
        a[j] += data[c];
    }
}

double elapsedTime = static_cast<double>(clock() - start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
sum = a[1];
// Declare and then fill in the lookup table
int lut[256];
for (unsigned c = 0; c < 256; ++c)
    lut[c] = (c >= 128) ? c : 0;

// Use the lookup table after it is built
for (unsigned i = 0; i < 100000; ++i)
{
    // Primary loop
    for (unsigned c = 0; c < arraySize; ++c)
    {
        sum += lut[data[c]];
    }
}
if (x < node->value)
    node = node->pLeft;
else
    node = node->pRight;

this library would do something like:

i = (x < node->value);
node = node->link[i];